RESEARCH PAPER
A single case study of eye activity during relaxation
Ross Cooper 1  
,  
Jason Cooper 2
,  
 
 
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1
Faculty of Health, Birmingham City University, Birmingham, UK
2
Optometrist, Nuneaton, UK
3
Department of Natural Sciences & Public Health, Zayed University, Dubai, UAE
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Ross Cooper   

Faculty of Health, Birmingham City University, Edgbaston, Birmingham B15 3TN, UK.
 
J Pre Clin Clin Res. 2010;4(2):154–157
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
Eye strain at work may occur when using computers. A protocol of motivational issues, the use of appropriate middleware and visual scenarios to respond to selected accurately measured stress levels was used. Relief of stress as a consequence of a number of factors including eye-strain was discussed. A NeXus-4 was used to determine physiological responses to viewing and partaking in various computer-displayed tasks in a healthy volunteer member of the authorship team who participated non-invasively in playing stress-relieving games: “Asteroids” and “Space Invaders” clones; Pzizz relaxing therapy (a. energizer, b. meditation, c. sleep); selected photographs of wildlife scenes set as a slide show; and a slide show of randomly selected photographs. The non-significant electro-oculogram (EOG) in all the relaxation tasks vs. baseline suggested that the participant’s eye movements were unstrained and mostly focused on the computer screen. For complete eye rest, our study suggested that Pzizz (sleep) was the most effective method. Looking at random photos was effective at creating a break from work screen-staring. Games, particularly Space invaders, were useful relaxation tasks as they provided more blinking episodes, thus alleviating eye strain resulting from prolonged computer screen staring which tends to dry out the eyes.
 
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