RESEARCH PAPER
ApoE genotype as risk factors for Alzheimer’s disease in the population of Lublin region, Poland
 
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University Memory and Cognition Center, Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland, Ohio, USA; Department of Neurodegenerative Diseases Institute of Agricultural Medicine, Lublin, Poland
CORRESPONDING AUTHOR
Katarzyna Gustaw-Rothenberg   

MD, PhD, Department of Neurodegenerative Diseases, Institute of Agricultural Medicine, Jaczewskiego 2, 20-090 Lublin, Poland.
 
J Pre Clin Clin Res. 2008;2(2):133–136
KEYWORDS
ABSTRACT
There is much data concerning ApoE in the pathology of Alzheimer’s disease. This study examines how ApoE genotype contributes to a risk for Alzheimer’s disease in the population of the Lublin region in Poland. The data were obtained as part of a population based BERCAL (Epidemiologic study of Alzheimer’s diseases and other forms of dementia in the population of Lublin region) study. Odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for AD, adjusted for age, were calculated for ApoE genotypes. Epsilon3/epsilon3 genotype was the most prevalent genotype in both examined groups. Epsilon2/epsilon2 and epsilon4/epsilon4 were the least prevalent. Among subjects, the risk of AD was significantly reduced for people with genotypes epsilon2/epsilon2. The same significant result was noticed where results were recalculated so that the presence of at least one epsilon2 allele was taken into account, without any epsilon 4 allele in each person. Increased risk with occurrence of epsilon 4 allele is not shown. Increased risk in epsilon 4 carriers was observed. The test did not reach the level of power required. This study suggests that the well known genetic factor, mainly ApoE, even if of noticeable importance, may not be a main risk factor among the population of the Lublin region in Poland.
 
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